PFAS As Hazardous Substances: Top 5 Implications For Businesses – Environmental Law – United States – Mondaq

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The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) took an important step toward regulating PFAS (per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances) on September 6, 2022 when it published a Notice of Federal Rulemaking to begin the process of listing two PFAS as hazardous substances under Section 102(a) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as the “Superfund” law). Specifically, perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), both of which have been identified as health hazards since 2016, are being reviewed. Comments on the proposal are due by October 6, 2022.
Listing these two PFAS as hazardous substances has the potential to affect a wide variety of businesses across industries. Here's what to expect:
The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought about your specific circumstances.
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